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Scotland Sailing
Insights into Sailing in Scotland
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Time to investigate a new destination?….The Glenuig Inn.

May 21st, 2012 alison

Glenuig Inn

The Glenuig Inn has now installed 10 Visitor Yacht Moorings in Glenuig Bay, including 2 for Yachts up to 15 tons and 8 for Yachts up to 10 tons.

The entrance to Glenuig Bay is at 56°50’N 05°49’W and our moorings are marked with Yellow Buoys. The text on the Buoys reads ‘Glenuig Inn’, ‘Pay at Bar’ & ‘Max 10 Tons’ or ‘Max 15 Tons’.

All are deep water moorings, with some outside and some inside the skerries; please call us to direct you to a suitable mooring for your needs.

Glenuig Bay has a Slipway that provides easy access for yachts, dive boats, dinghys, kayaks and fishing boats at almost all states of the tide, being both just a short walk and visible from the Inn.

Glenuig Bay

We charge £10 per 24 hours or part thereof, payable at the Bar in Glenuig Inn, which is fully refundable if you Dine with Us the same day or evening.

Glenuig Inn is open all day, every day, serving Sea-food and Home-cooked meals from 12.00pm to 9.00pm daily, all year round.

Bookings are not required, but please let us know if your party is 8 or more persons.

To slake your thirst we serve a good selection of Real Ales, Organic Wines, Malts & more for you to enjoy . . .

Please call us on 0795 735 6099 or email us on moorings@glenuig.com to book your mooring or for any enquiries . . . and we are pet friendly, so the ship’s dog can come ashore too!

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A Grand Day Out…

November 16th, 2011 alison

Wednesday, 15th June 2011 and yacht “Azores High” slipped its lines and departed Kip Marina early in the morning. The crew on board were on a mission to pick up the crew of Timeline Films who were filming for BBC’s Grand Tours of Scotland. As the yacht sailed south to its destination of Millport Bay the rain seemed continuous, but as we got further south it started to lighten, eventually drying up just in time for us to meet with the rib that would collect the crew from the jetty and bring them out to us.

Grand Day out

With the crew making it out to the yacht dry, cups of tea were issued and then after setting the sails the filming began. With Paul Murton on the helm, the pieces to camera were completed as we sailed through the Cumbrae Pass and past the Tann spit. With the wind dying Richard, the cameraman made a hasty retreat to the rib to get some shots of the yacht sailing from there before being dropped on the beach at Little Cumbrae island to get some shots from shore. With the crew happy that they had all they needed we headed towards Largs where the rib was  to drop them to make their trip home by road. Until… we realised that nobody had picked up Richard from the shore! Beating a hasty retreat and retrieving him we then continued to Largs, dropping off the crew and heading on homewards to Inverkip. We had a great day and look forward to seeing how sailing in Scotland is portrayed in the show.

Andy taking the crew back to Largs

Watch it tonight, Wednesday 16th November at 20.30 on BBC1 Scotland. (And we’ll keep our fingers crossed that they don’t use the clip where the genoa didn’t tack nicely!)

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Celebration Daysail

June 17th, 2011 alison

Meet Linda and Colin who celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary with Mainsail Yachting onboard “Pamina”.

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After a slow start to Season 2011, plagued by strong winds and heavy rain, we were glad we managed to get them out for a sail and, despite the waterproofs, the day remained largely dry for them!

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Thank you for sending us your photos. Skipper John, and crew Laura, had a fab day too and we hope to see you again soon!

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The great “Dileas” adventure… (Part 5)

November 2nd, 2009 alison

Read Part 4

We got up early to catch the tide down the Sound of Mull and make our way to Kerrera for some crew changes. Being close to Oban it has good transport connections and also gave us the opportunity to have a meal ashore in one of the restaurants on the North Pier.

The next day after the crew change over and some provisioning we carried on our way to Puilladobhrain where we were going to anchor for the night. Being not much more than an hours sail from Oban it makes a good stop if you can’t leave until after lunch. There was limited space there as 15 boats were already anchored, but we found a gap and enjoyed what remained of the sun while watching a seal play around the boats in the hope he would get lucky with some food.

Evening at Puilladobhrain

Sunset at Puilladobhrain

The next part of the trip was going to take us south again, although when we left Puilladobhrain we hadn’t actually decided where we were going to stop. We left early and passed Insh Island, Easdale, and retraced our steps through the Cuan Sound. We had decided we wanted a mooring or a berth rather than anchoring and that gave us options of Kilmelford Harbour and Pier, Kilmelford Yacht Haven, Craobh Marina or Crinan boatyard. After deciding that Loch Melfort would probably be more peaceful than Crinan boatyard we headed there and picked up a mooring at Kilmelford Harbour and Pier, just in time to inflate the dinghy before lunch, and to spend a leisurely afternoon on shore.

Fishing boat on the beach at Loch Melfort

Fishing boat on the beach at Loch Melfort

The final part of our trip was to take us to Ardfern where we were leaving the boat. As we got ready to leave the wind picked up and we had one of the best sails of the trip down Loch Shuna, through the Dorus Mor and up Loch Craignish, avoiding the lobster pots as we went. We were tied up in the marina about 4 and a half hours later and cleaned up the boat and ourselves before we treated ourselves to a final night dinner in the Galley of Lorne.

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The great “Dileas” adventure… (Part 3)

October 26th, 2009 alison

Read Part 2

The next day we had planned to head to Oban and try to sneak into Kerrera to berth while all the West Highland Week fleet was out racing. However, we had a change of plan and decided to head for Loch Aline instead where we could spend the night at anchor. Having spent the first part of our holidays in marinas and canals we were looking forward to the change.

We left Craobh and headed for the Cuan Sound, a picturesque narrow channel between the islands of Seil and Luing. We passed by Easdale and headed up the Sound of Luing aiming for the Sound of Mull. There was quite a breeze once we got into the open water and having started with one reef in the main and a well reefed genoa we decided we’d be more comfortable with a second reef and further tested our single line reefing (a pleasant change from the  slab reefing which we were used to!).  Feeling more under control we headed again towards the Sound of Mull passing Insh Island to  starboard, and the entrance of Loch Spelve to port. Just as we were reaching Lady Rock we saw the lead boats in the West Highland Week fleet heading past Lismore Light in the Round Lismore Race. This year they had gone anti-clockwise around Lismore Island. Following close on their heels was the rest of the fleet. Being used to being part of the fleet I hadn’t realised how spectacular it could look, and seeing all the yachts reaching along the island side by side was really fantastic.

West Highland Week fleet off Lismore Light

West Highland Week passes Lismore Light

We carried on up the Sound of Mull passing Glas Eilean to port and as we got closer to Loch Aline’s entrance rolled away the genoa, sailing through the entrance under the power of the main. You need to keep an eye on the ferry leaving Loch Aline as the entrance is quite narrow and meeting the ferry on its way out would have made it feel very tight for space. We dropped the main once inside the loch, decided where to anchor, and tested the windlass for the first time this trip. Anchored in 9m just into south of the entrance we found ourselves nicely sheltered from the southerly winds forecast, and although another 5 or 6 boats joined us throughout the rest of the day it remained peaceful. The plan for the next part was to head for Loch Drumbuie, and then to make the short hop to Tobermory to join in some of the shoreside festivities that accompany West Highland Week.

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The great “Dileas” adventure… (Part 2)

October 23rd, 2009 alison

Read Part 1.

The rain from the previous day had gone when we got up, but it didn’t seem far away. We decided to stay above the canal basin and watch all the boats head through the locks - and as the fleet was heading through for West Highland Week there was almost guaranteed to be some entertainment…

As we had our morning coffee the bottleneck began and we were glad to be tucked in out the way against the wall.

A busier Crinan Canal

Crinan bottleneck

As most of the yachts were heading North through the Dorus Mor most had to be away by lunchtime, and with the bottleneck over we enjoyed a peaceful afternoon and evening with coffee and cake outside the Crinan coffee shop, and later some drinks in the Crinan Hotel bar.

Sunday started a bit sunnier, but with strong winds forecast we decided just to head to Craobh marina, which gave us the option of heading to Oban the next day if the forecast was still for strong winds. We thought we might have seen some of the West Highland Week fleet racing from Craobh to Oban, but we were just a bit too late and just caught the tail end of the fleet rounding the bottom of Shuna, heading up the Sound of Luing and past Fladda Light.

As the weather was nice we extended our sail and went past Craobh, into Loch Melfort to investigate the anchorages and moorings there. Then it was back to Craobh to settle for the evening and enjoy the fabulous sunset.

Berthed at Craobh Marina

"Dileas", and the Craobh sunset

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Coming soon….

August 17th, 2009 alison

…. some West Coast antics

"Dileas" at Tighnabruaich

…on the good ship “Dileas”

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Sunny weather and summer holidays

July 15th, 2009 alison

The recent spell of gloriously sunny weather looked set to end this week on the Clyde, but so far at Kip the rain has not managed to make a lasting appearance. Good news for the two sailing courses out! One course was out over the weekend and arrived back in this afternoon having had some rain, but also enough time to dry out before having to pack away their things and head home. The second course departed yesterday after some berthing practise. The weather forecast showed numerous low pressure systems heading their way and it seemed like they were doomed to a damp week, but it turns out that if the weather holds as it has done the last couple of days they may only get rained on in the mornings!

Looking out at Kip Marina at the moment the sun is beating down on the boats, but many of the berths are empty as people have gone on their summer cruises. This weekend the Clyde Cruising Club holds its annual Tobermory Race, a race popular with members who want to go sailing around the west coast for their holidays.  With options to sail Round the Mull to Crinan on the 17th July, or to go from Rothesay to Ardrishaig on the 18th, heading west through the Crinan Canal, to join up with the boats which have gone Round the Mull for the second part of the race from Loch Craignish to Tobermory on the 19th July. This year the tides appear to have been kind to the competitors with a 9am start rather than the 4am start it often can be.

The last Fairlie Yacht Club event was the Holy Loch Race on the 4th July. Light winds meant the racing took most of the day, but the fleet managed to avoid most of the rain showers which were gracing our shores that day. The next Fairlie event is not until the 15th August with a crew race from Largs to Ardlamont, and a muster at Portavadie marina that evening.

With so many boats away, or about to head off on their cruising adventures, the marina is quite quiet, but there was some excitment as the marina’s resident swans hatched their eggs and 4 new signets are now learning to swim in the peaceful waters of Kip.

Proud parents

Proud parents with the new additions to the Kip family

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Life on the oceanwave…

June 22nd, 2009 alison

Saturday’s sail on board “Blue”, our Moody 54, went down a storm…

At the wheel..

At the wheel..

Itinerary: Kip - Rothesay - Dunoon - Kip

Chilling at the stern..

Chilling at the stern..

Max. boat speed 7.5 knots…

Max. wind speed 39.5 knots…

Cutting through the waves...

Cutting through the waves...

Other daysails available on Saturday 27th June, Friday 24th July and Saturday 29th August. Contact Charter For You for details.

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Inspiration for Father’s Day

June 16th, 2009 alison
Blue - our Moody 54 under sail

Blue - our Moody 54 under sail

If you’re looking for something a bit different for Father’s Day this year why not treat him to a day’s sailing on our Moody 54 “Blue”? Departing from Kip Marina this Saturday, 20th June at 9.30am, sail the beautiful Clyde, stopping somewhere peaceful for lunch, before returning to the marina about 4.30pm. You can take an active part in sailing the yacht, or you can just sit back, relax, and enjoy the scenery. The day is all inclusive of a soup and sandwich lunch, and although we can’t promise glorious weather, the forecast at the moment, looks set for a sunny day!

Contact Charter For You on 01369 830 258 or via the contact form for further information or to book.

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